• Engaging in Math
  • Rich Learning Environment
  • Traffic Lights
  • Co-planning

Welcome to DI CI what works. . .

The purpose of the website is to foster conversations about effective and differentiated instruction and about collaborative inquiry as a way of learning for educators. You are encouraged to make connections to your own practice and context.

Boards from across Ontario have closed gaps in student achievement. On this website, they provide answers to the question; "What's the difference that makes the difference?" Multi-level teams (classroom, school and board) of educators and students discuss key factors that lead to student success. You can find their stories here as Skype conversations with supporting artefacts and relevant data.

Although a particular focus or initiative may serve as a catalyst for change, the conversations describe a synergy – an interaction of a variety of supports and conditions that have a positive impact on student learning.

Over the course of the conversations, five key themes emerged as being common to all of the boards. Click on a theme or a board to find out more.


Themes - From the information, common themes have developed including...

High Expectations

High Expectations

A growth mindset with clear goals and support for student success at all levels: classroom, school and board

Visit Section

Professional Learning for Change

Professional Learning for Change

Multi-level learning, including collaborative inquiry, that is differentiated based on the
learning needs of educators

Visit Section

Engaging and Effective Instruction

Engaging and Effective Instruction

Attention to the multiple components of instruction, as represented in the Complexity of Instruction, to address the varied learning strengths and needs of 21 century learners
Visit Section

Student Voice

Student Voice

Authentic involvement of students in the classroom, school and board in designing a system that supports their learning
Visit Section

Leadership and Supporting Conditions

Leadership and Supporting Conditions

Leadership practices that result in structures, processes and resources
that support collaboration and learning at all levels


Visit Section

Boards - Classroom artefacts and raw video commentary from the teachers making a difference in high-achieving school districts

How to Use this Website

While you’ll certainly get the most out of this website by reading and watching all of the content, we’ve made it so you can jump in at any point and gather what you need. You can skim to areas that interest you. You can choose to read, watch or simply download the elements you want. You can find what you need, then take away what you want. You’ll also find links to definitions and more resources.

You’ll notice the work is multi-level including classroom, school and board level. On each theme page, you’ll quickly be able to identify which area you’re interested in by the colour coding.

Exploring Practice

You’ll find discussion questions on each page. These are questions you can use to reflect on your own learning and thinking or to get a conversation started. What’s the difference that is making the difference? is just one question you can use when thinking about student engagement, achievement and well-being.



Sharing

We also want to hear your story. Please go to Sharing to let us know what you’re doing that has made a difference. You’ll notice social media icons on each page, feel free to share as you please. Are you using a tool in a different way than might be expected? Have you revamped something you found here for your learners?



Connecting to Research

Compexity of Instruction

You’ll also find quotes and excerpts from experts related to (learning, teaching and leading). Use them as discussion starters or as the first step in finding out more about an area of interest!

Research tells us that the most effective professional learning involves:

  • collaborative settings to help teachers step outside their own frame of reference
  • seeking additional opportunities for teacher learning that specifically target identified student learning dilemmas rather than over reliance on internally generated ideas
  • instructional responses that are selected in light of evidence rather than “personally valued practices"
  • interactions with other teacher work groups, school-based instructional leaders, or varied external sources of expertise

Cosner, S. (2012). Leading the ongoing development of collaborative data practices: advancing a schema